Golden Research Article - August 2020

Kyle Beavis

Kyle Beavis

Exercise Physiologist

SHARE THIS POST

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on email
Email
Share on google
Google+

Physical Therapy vs Glucocorticoid Injection for Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Deyle et al. (2020)

Background

The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of glucocorticoid (cortisone) injections and physical therapy in patients with osteoarthritis.

Both physical therapy and cortisone injections into the knee joint have been recommended for the management of knee osteoarthritis. What is unclear, however, is whether the short-term and long-term effectiveness for relieving pain and improving physical function differs between these two interventions.

Method

This study was a 1 year randomised controlled trial. 156 people participated in the study, had a mean age of 56 years and all participants had a confirmed diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis. Participants were randomly assigned into two groups; i-physical therapy (manual therapy and exercise), and ii-cortisone injection.

Those in the physical therapy group attended 8 sessions in the first 4-6 weeks, with the option of attending three more sessions at the fourth and ninth month mark. For those in the cortisone injection group, participants had one injection at baseline and if deemed appropriate, had an additional injection at the fourth and ninth month mark.

Results

At the 1 year mark, there was a clinically significant difference favouring the physical therapy group in both relieving pain and improving physical function. 8 participants (10.3%) in the physical therapy group failed to demonstrate a clinically important improvement from baseline. This is compared to the cortisone injection group who had 20 participants (25.6%) showing no clinically significant improvement.

Key Points

  • Cortisone injections have been considered best practice for people with knee osteoarthritis. Recent evidence, however, has called into question the clinical effectiveness and safety of these injections for patients with knee osteoarthritis.
  • Manual therapy and exercise were superior to cortisone injections for improving pain and physical function at the 1 year mark in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

If you are dealing with persistent knee pain, please get in contact with the clinic to see one of our clinicians to help manage your symptoms and improve your function. To make an appointment call 42608574 or book online.

Stop waiting and

Get help today!

The Important Stuff